7 Steps to Celebrating your Successes

Here’s some great tips on how to celebrate your success – from Peter McFadyen.  It’s coming up to that time where we want to look at what worked and what didn’t work for us in 2018 and celebrate what we achieved.  

A tip given to me constantly through leadership training over the years has been the importance of celebrating success. This allows you the opportunity to pause, to recognise what you have achieved and to feel good about it. It focusses you on what capabilities and opportunities have contributed to your success, whether or not you are still on target to reach your ultimate goal and provides motivation to keep heading down the path you are on. In a team environment it can build a combined passion and commitment for the work to come, while in an individual sense it can build resolve and purpose and allow you space to take stock of where you are in your journey.

Given we are on the edge of a new year, it’s a great time to have a look at our successes and celebrate them.

The steps to do this are fairly straight forward:

1) Take stock of where you are now.
2) Look honestly at where you began.
3) Capture what the key development stages were.
4) Note what capabilities and opportunities contributed to your success.
5) See what benefits you have received by doing the work you have done.
6) Check to see if you are still on the right path and how it looks into the future.
7) Commit this stage of your journey to some sort of stored form so that you can celebrate it again later and use it to help with future development.

Over the years as I have worked to grow and be aware of who I am I have often turned to poetry as a way of undertaking stage seven of that process. Poetry allows me to capture my thoughts succinctly and honestly. I find that this format allows me a space where, though I may be confronted by the truth I choose to face, it is written in such a way that I am able to take in on board and enjoy the journey it describes.

I had the good fortune, many years ago, to come across a poem by Portia Nelson entitled “Autobiography in Five Short Chapters.” This is undoubtedly one of the most powerful poems I have ever read and I encourage you to read it as it sums up the journey of self-awareness and development in very few words. I love its simplicity, its directness and, in my case, its applicability to my approach to life at the time I read it and since that time. The following poem is unashamedly based on Portia’s work and it allowed me the opportunity to reflect on the changes I had seen in myself and to celebrate that success. It is called “I look in the mirror.”

mirror and sky

I look in the Mirror

I look in the mirror

I look in the mirror and what do I see?
Am I happy with who’s looking back at me?
I decide yes, my look is okay,
I have no issues, not me, no way!
I take ego into the world today.

I look in the mirror and what do I see?
Am I happy with who’s looking back at me?
I decide no, something’s not right,
My hair won’t sit straight and my clothes are too tight!
I take discomfort into the world today.

I look in the mirror and what to I see?
Am I happy with who’s looking back at me?
I’m really not sure for when looking at me,
Old wrongs and past hurts often cloud what I see.
I take pain into the world today.

I look in the mirror and what do I see?
Am I happy with who’s looking back at me?
I think of the future and not my reflection,
My vision is clouded by my introspection.
I take uncertainty into the world today.

I look in the mirror and what do I see?
Am I happy with who’s looking back at me?
I live more in the present, and find bit by bit,
The kind of reflection into which I can fit.
I take peace in to the world today.

I look in the mirror and what do I see?
Am I happy with who’s looking back at me?
My reflection now shows the values I live,
I can now see a person I’m prepared to forgive.
I take kindness into the world today.

I look in the mirror and what do I see?
Am I happy with who’s looking back at me?
I am!
I see me!
I take acceptance into the world today.

I no longer need the mirror!

Have you celebrated your success recently or are you working so hard at achieving that you have not taken the time? Now is a great time to acknowledge what you have already accomplished, to check in with where you are headed and to re-commit to your journey.

“Let your life be your message” Mahatma Gandhi

The poetry of mountain climbing

Here’s Peter McFadyen guest blogging for Life Support on his poetry of mountain climbing.  Love adventure?  Peter does.  

Mountain Climbing is now one of the joys of my life (and for those grammatically inflexible amongst us; yes I do realise that I have capitalised “Mountain Climbing” but that’s how I pronounce it in my mind).  Once I had recovered from climbing Mt Meru and Mt Kilimanjaro to the extent that I was no longer adamant that I’d never climb again, I began to look into the changes that I had discovered in myself since the climb. 

I found increased levels of self-confidence, an inherent trust in my ability to take on challenges and do well.  I found the yardstick against which I measured challenges to have grown taller, making any challenge I now came up against seem that much smaller.  I was also much more comfortable with being uncomfortable and so my resilience and ability to persevere were greatly increased.  This is a very pleasant way to live life and I found that many of my previous peaks and troughs were now smoothed out by the personal growth and awareness I had gained by taking on challenges and seeing how my actual experience matched my expectations on how I’d go.          

Man climbing ice Something changed – I was part of the mountain and it was part of me.

Something had fundamentally changed in the way I viewed the world and the way I viewed myself and my place in it.  This was not by the way of increased ego, or a superman complex, but more in an increased sense of myself, my place in the world and an ease of living that was borne of experience.  In short, I was happier being me and more confident that I could make a worthwhile contribution to the planet – albeit in a small way.   I also knew that when it came right down to it, I could push myself to achieve and that I would enjoy the experience no matter the effort required. 

Another joy of my life is poetry.  I love reading it, I love discovering new verses and finding the message within them and I love writing it.  Consequently I have a love of the ‘notes’ area on smart phones as I will often be doing something and a phrase will pop into my head.  From discovering that phrase I will normally have a fully formed poem a few minutes later.  I’m not sure how that works and at times I believe that I am just a way of the poem coming to life rather than having ‘created’ it myself. 

In this instance I was driving along a back road and saw a mountain peak in the distance.  Rather than just thinking “Wow that’s pretty” or “I wonder what that’s called” my thoughts immediately ran to “I wonder how I’d climb that?”   What?  Why that thought?  I realised that, having climbed a mountain, I was in some respects a ‘mountain climber’ and my view of the world had changed.  I then thought, “having climbed a mountain” – I could do something with that.  And so the following poem came to life:

Having climbed the mountain

Having climbed the mountain, there can be no “un-climbing”

Your view of the world is forever changed

You have outgrown yourself to be there

And having outgrown, you no longer fit into your life as you once did.

Having climbed the mountain, you have made the sacrifice

You have left something on the mountain

You have carried something away with you

You are no longer the person who commenced the climb

Having climbed the mountain, there is now a question

Each time you see a peak, you ask “How would I climb that?”

These may be physical peaks or challenges of the heart and mind

All peaks must be met, just needing time and devotion to task,

Turning from a peak is no longer in your being

Having climbed a mountain there is now a void

A challenge waiting to be met,

A dissatisfaction with your old path or any easy path

An ache to once again go beyond

Having climbed a mountain there is now a choice

To turn your back on what you have become, or

To embrace the fear of knowing that you can go beyond

And in doing so, bring the mountain into your being.

View from mountain top We all have our mountains to climb – and when we do the view is amazing

We are all capable of ‘climbing the mountain’ – of moving outside our comfort zones.  It is here that growth occurs; the benefits of which can last a lifetime if we choose. 

What mountain is waiting for you and what can you do to ready yourself to climb it?  What will you leave behind and what will you take away?   I hope you have the opportunity to find out soon.   

“Let your life be your message” Mahatma Gandhi